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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
What we found out is all these accusations that American lawmakers have leveled against Wawei and ZTE in China, basically American lawmakers accused those companies of planting backdoors in their systems allowing the PLA to spy on American corporations. And what we have been finding out in our report is the US government has been doing the exact same thing. So It definitely puts American lawmakers in a bind and it puts American companies in a bind in terms of their global market share. It will be interesting to see what happens over the next coming months.
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
Well, the NSA put out a statement today that effectively said that this was a huge setback for them, and that they didn't believe that the story should have been published, that national security concerns outweighed the public's need to know and debate about this topic. Everyone else I've spoken with, however, is very glad we made these disclosures. People in the cryptography community that thought they had won this war with encryption two decades ago are heartbroken. American companies are extremely frustrated
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
Perlroth continued: that they continue to make assurance to their customers that their systems have not been breached or compromised and are not handing the government their encryption keys, but i think the public no longer can trust those assurances any more. So I think what we're seeing now is a fundamental lack of trust.
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
This is huge. This was the last bastion of privacy on the internet and what we've discovered is that the last few decades, the NSA has been actively working to crack or circumvent the encryption technologies we all use, not just for internet banking and to protect medical records and electronic voting systems, but that we actually, as you pointed out, use for everyday internet communications like e-mail or internet chats, et cetera.
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
What we've learned is that there's been a sustained, mult-ipronged effort to break or circumvent many of the encryption technologies that have been developed over the last two decades. So in some cases, the NSA. is using its power and influence as the world's best code maker to set standards that only it knows how to break. In other cases, it's getting into servers and taking encryption keys. It's using secret court orders, in some cases through its intermediaries, to grab encryption
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
In some cases, it's (NSA) working hand in hand with companies to embed itself into encryption chips that scramble information for much of the world's businesses and governments or working with companies to build in custom solutions that give it pre-encrypted access to communications. This has all been done in secret. So as we point out
Nicole Perlroth
Cybersecurity Reporter for The New York Times
KRCB 09/06/2013
...in our article. Two decades ago, we as a nation had a big conversation around the clipper chip, which was the Clinton administration's way of putting in a backdoor to all encryption technologies. And as a nation, we decided that this was fundamentally unacceptable, that we wanted some things to remain secret. What we found out yesterday and what we said today in our article is that the NSA has gotten around that-- effectively done the same thing in secret.
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